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Benefits of Green Tea

There’s something comforting about enjoying a warm cup of tea. What’s even better is choosing green tea and reaping the health benefits that come with it. 

Green tea is made from Camellia sinensis leaves and is widely used for a beverage, which has a stimulant effect due to caffeine. Green tea is made from leaves steamed and dried, while black tea leaves are withered, rolled, fermented and dried. It is often combined with flavor additives such as jasmine flowers, orange peels and tropical fruits.

Green tea boasts of a variety of health benefits in addition to being a delicious and popular drink. Here are just a few of benefits from drinking green tea.

Heart Health – According to a study published in “Current Medicinal Chemistry”, Pon Velayutham and colleagues found flavonoids in green tea can help prevent oxidation of LDL (bad) cholesterol and reduce blood clotting as well as help lower blood pressure.

Weight Loss – Green tea is thought to aid weight loss by boosting the body’s metabolism to be more efficient. Regularly exercising and eating a healthy diet are highly effective weight loss strategies. Replacing sodas and sugary drinks with a cup of green tea may help increase positive results.

Blood Sugar – Keeping blood sugar at a reasonable level can be difficult. Green tea may help manage glycemic loads and manage blood sugar levels. In a study performed in Japan, people consumed six or more cups a day saw a stunning 33% percent risk reduction of developing Type 2 diabetes.

Pro Tip: Ideal temperature for steeping green tea is between 160-180 F. Boiling the water to hot can damage the tea leaves, causing it to taste bitter. 

Sources:

Duke, James A. “Camellia sinensis (L.) Kuntze” Handbook of Energy Crops, 1983, https://hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/duke_energy/Camellia_sinensis.html

Pon Velayutham, Anandh Babu, and Dongmin Liu. “Green tea catechins and cardiovascular health: an update.” Current Medicinal Chemistry vol. 15,18 (2008): 1840-50. doi:10.2174/092986708785132979

Kim, Hyun Min, and Jaetaek Kim. “The effects of green tea on obesity and type 2 diabetes.” Diabetes & metabolism journal vol. 37,3 (2013): 173-5. doi:10.4093/dmj.2013.37.3.173 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3689013/

Seasonal Affective Disorder

Season Affective Disorder (SAD) is a form of depression that cycles with seasonal changes. For most people with this disorder, symptoms begin in late autumn or early winter and subside during the spring and summer.

Short dark days and cold temperatures can make anyone wish for warm sunny days, but seasonal affective disorder is more than just experiencing the winter blues. According to the Mayo Clinic, decline in the amount of daylight during fall and winter months is to blame for SAD.

Symptoms of SAD can include:
• Tiredness and loss of energy
• An increased need to sleep
• Cravings for carbohydrate
• Weight gain
• Social withdrawal
• Slow, sluggish, lethargic movements

In addition to seeking help from a healthcare professional, there are a few lifestyle changes that can improve symptoms and lift your mood.
• Maximize exposure to daylight – make the home brighter, keep blinds and curtains open during the day.
• Engage in activities – spend time with friends and family, go to the mall and other activities you enjoy.
• Practice healthy habits – exercise, get enough sleep, eat a well-balanced diet, spend time outdoors if possible.
• Get plenty of sleep.

Seasonal Affective Disorder can make it hard to feel motivated, but there are plenty of steps to take to help yourself feel better. By adopting healthy habits and scheduling fun and relaxation into the day, you can help lift the SAD cloud for a sunnier day.

PREPARING THE ELDERLY FOR AUTUMN AND RELATED HAZARDS

PREPARING THE ELDERLY FOR AUTUMN AND RELATED HAZARDS

 

Wear Layers, When Going Out.

Throughout the fall, temperatures can begin to feel cooler. However with the fall season, especially in Texas, one can find that it may be warm during the day and chiller by the evening. Be prepared for both instances with a sweatshirt, light jacket, or a hat, according to where you are located.

Senior Care and Seasonal Vaccines.

Cold and flu season begins in the fall , so getting a seasonal flu vaccine can help prevent unwanted illnesses. Washing your hands thoroughly with hot, soapy water for at least 30 seconds prevents the spread of bacteria and germs. Be sure to lots of sleep to strengthen your immune system to help your body naturally fight intruders.

Residential Maintenance.

For the elderly that are living by themselves may want to have a professional to check their heating systems. Even for those who reside in assisted living communities, now is an excellent time to grab a space heater or even two for those who feel cold. Never leave them unsupervised. Place at least 3 ft. between the heater and walls or curtains.

Outdoor Precautions and Senior Care.

Autumn remains warm enough to get out and enjoy outsides activities. The autumn weather can present certain obstacles for the elderly since rains cause slick surfaces and falling foliage could cause risky and low visible walking conditions. There is plenty of work associated with maintaining a safe outside area and driveways throughout autumn, so hiring a professional service prevents debris buildup and keeps walking paths clear.

Be Prepared For an Emergency

Transitioning weather can cause storms leading to power outages, loss of heat, water and phone services. Inclement weather means a difficult time venturing out for essential supplies. Prepare for emergency situations:

  • Store lots of non-perishables and clean water.
  • Keep candles, fresh batteries, flashlights, extra blankets, Sterno fuel and a battery-operated radio available.
  • Don’t wait on a crisis to establish a system of communication. Everyone, not just the elderly, living alone ought to create a “buddy system.”

Keeping appropriate heat levels inside the home is an integral part of elderly care. It is unfortunate that, many people are not able to afford for heating. Senior care and assistance programs provide a safe and clean environment for seniors where they have access to care and necessities to experience a high quality of life.

 

by  | Oct 10, 2015 | GeneralHelpful Information for Family MembersSenior Safety Tips |

Help Your Senior Prepare For Winter

Winter is approaching and as the temperature drops, it’s important for older adults to prepare for the potential risks that cold weather can bring.

For the thousands of seniors living in the Northwest, winter may pose a number of risks. Reports have shown much higher incidences of injury and illness due to icy sidewalks, cold and dry air, flu viruses and in many cases, hypothermia.

According to the Healthy Aging Partnership, a coalition of more than 40 Puget Sound not-for-profit and public organizations dedicated to the health and well-being of older adults, older adults should keep these tips in mind to help ensure safety and optimum health this winter.

  • Older adults are more susceptible to hypothermia, which occurs when too much heat escapes from the body. It is important to dress warmly and keep dry, but equally important to remember good nutrition. Food provides the fuel we need to keep warm. Hot food and warm drinks are best to warm the body.
  • When going outdoors, remember to dress warmly. Wear layered, loose-fitting clothing and mittens. When possible, wear a hat to protect against heat loss since close to half of all body heat is lost through the head.
  • You can prevent many winter hazards simply by planning ahead. Before winter arrives, check all the windows and doors in your home for cracked or worn sealants. A new application of caulking may be needed; in a pinch, staple a sheet of plastic tarp over really old windows.
  • Talk to your electric or gas companies to see if you can be put on a level billing system that averages your energy payments equally over 12 months. This doesn’t save money, but it does help to budget during the heating season and prevent your heat from being shut off.
  • To avoid slips and falls, wear non-skid boots or other shoes with plenty of traction.
  • Cold weather can put extra strain on the heart. When doing winter chores such as shoveling snow, do some warm-up exercises first and take many breaks.
  • To conserve energy, heat only those rooms that you use. Close off the attic, garage, basement, spare bedrooms or storage areas. But don’t overdo your money-saving efforts: keep your thermostat set to at least 65 degrees to prevent hypothermia.
  • Shift energy use from peak to off-peak times. For example, do small things like running your dishwasher after 9 p.m.
  • When using a portable heater, plug the heater directly into an outlet, not to an extension cord. Make sure the outlet and wiring are in good condition. Keep the area around the heater clear of furniture, newspaper or other flammable materials and take special care to avoid tripping over cords.

Article from www.4elders.org